A Beautiful Mess…

Below you will find a great blog which asks the question, “Is Your Church Messy Enough?”   I found it a great read.  Two years ago we were faced with a decision to relocate our church…when we made a decision to relocate into an area of our county that to be honest, most churches were moving out of, it invigorated me. We were a church full of broken people saved by God’s grace, encountering broken people in need of God’s grace!   At the time the decisions were being made, one of the exact requests made by a member was that we find “prime property and build a new building with a steeple and columns.” I am so glad overall as a congregation, we were moved to be more concerned with people than architecture or even prime property.

As a result of this season of growth in our church life, Trinity is becoming more racially and economically diverse, we are making a impact on our community and the World, and we are striving to be a biblically healthy church. We are striving to deliver the gospel message to those around us. But we are people that struggle in our marriages, in our jobs, with our health, with our in laws and with our children. We are people who are walking with one another in mud and messes of life and it is tough… and fun and exciting. When I read this, it encouraged me.   It reminded me how delighted and honored I am to be a part of this fellowship.

 

http://www.challies.com/articles/is-your-church-messy-enough?utm_content=buffercb812&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer

I love my church. I love the people I gather with week-by-week. They are fun and safe and easy to be with. But who said church should be safe and easy? What if one of the marks of a good church, a blessed church, is that it’s a messy church?

I’m sure you know of the parable of The Lost Sheep in Luke 15. We call it “The Parable of The Lost Sheep” but it is actually “The Parable of the Kind and Loving Shepherd.” The sheep aren’t the point of the story. Like so many of Jesus’ parables, this parable was told in the presence of two groups of people—people who were convinced of their own badness and people who were convinced of their own goodness. And in this case Jesus was speaking primarily to those good and religious people.

The parable is simple: A sheep has wandered off from the flock and become lost. The shepherd will not rest until he has found it and restored it to himself. He goes, he searches, he finds, he restores, he rejoices. Just think about that silly, helpless sheeping, wandering lost and alone in the wilderness. Think about that tired shepherd who had to go wandering far and wide to find him. Think of the ways he could have responded when he finally tracked it down.

The shepherd finds his sheep and rebukes it: “You stupid, ignorant sheep. How dare you wander off from me?” No. He doesn’t rebuke it.

The shepherd finds his sheep and punishes it: “You dumb, disobedient sheep. I’ll teach you to wander off!” No, he doesn’t punish it.

The shepherd finds his sheep and is disgusted by it: “You are filthy and smelly! What on earth did you get into? You go clean yourself up right now and I’ll come back later.” No, he doesn’t make it clean itself up.

The shepherd finds his sheep and sells it: “I can’t have a sheep like you polluting my flock. Do you know how you made me look in front of everyone else?” No, he doesn’t get rid of it.

“And when he has found it, he lays it on his shoulders, rejoicing.” Yeah, that’s the one. When that shepherd finds his sheep, he cares for it. He hoists that big, heavy, dirty sheep onto his shoulders and carries it home, rejoicing all the way. He carries it home and calls his friends and throws a party to celebrate.

He doesn’t save those who are righteous and whose lives are all put together, he saves those who are just plain bad.

The point of the parable is that God loves to save the lost. He loves to save sinners. He doesn’t save those who are righteous and whose lives are all put together, he saves those who are just plain bad. He saves the messy ones, not the ones who are convinced they are clean.

If God is in the business of saving sinners, we need to expect that church will be full of sinners—those who are still wandering and those who have only just been found. If our churches reflect God’s heart for the lost, they will be full of people with problems, full of people showing the consequences of a lifetime of wandering. And this means that church may not be a safe and easy place. It may not be a place full of people who have it all together. It may be messy. It should be messy. Thank God if it is messy.